Tapir

Tapir is a sign of trailblazing, flexibility, and getting to the root of the emotional situation. Tapir is native to Central and South America. Tapir is the largest land mammal in those regions, about the size of a small cow, and informally called the “mountain cow”.  Tapir is closest related to the Horse followed by the Rhinoceros.  Although the Tapir was included in Mayan art little is published about the historic significance, other than it’s use as a source of food.  Tapirs status as the largest land mammal of it’s region is a symbol of getting from place to place.  Tapir creates trails through the thick forested areas she inhabits.  Tapir reminds us not to be afraid to blaze a new trail especially if something smells delicious in that direction.  

Tapir has a special snout that has no bone in it.  This unusual attribute allows them to reach foliage in hard to get places.  They also have a powerful sense of smell and their especially malleable snout helps them sniff the air for predators and environmental changes.  Tapir is a reminder to stay flexible.  We need to look in multiple places to find our solution and try to reach to places that are a little hard to get to. When we’re sorting out a situation Tapir reminds us to stay flexible and try an unusual approach. 

Tapirs actually spend a large amount of their time in the water.  They swim to keep cool, and keep away from predators, but they will also allow themselves to sink to the bottom to feed on the vegetation.  This behavior reminds us to get to the bottom of our emotional situation.  Our emotions feed our psyche, and if there’s a negative seed or under current of emotion it can play out in our lives in myriad ways. If the underlying current, or root of our emotional situation is positive it will be easier to face trivialities and frustrations, and overcome the obstacles life presents us.  Tapir is a reminder that emotions feed us and we should be picky about which ones we surround ourselves with.  If other people in our lives are constantly spewing negativity our direction, maybe it’s time to move to friendlier waters.  Tapir reminds us that we can choose our emotional situation, either an externally or internally. If we can’t get away from the external factors, it’s vital that we take the time to process our internal emotional situation, and try to keep our inner reality as positive as possible.

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